Is print retro chic?

The beauty and challenge of the digital world is the vast information flow. The challenge is the volume of seductive diversions that lead many of us away from our original search.

A recent study by PEW Research found that 50 percent of Millennials still prefer, and place a high value on, print. The PEW findings support a Huffington Post piece published on February 2, 2015 (Sorry, Ebooks. These 9 studies show why print is better). American University linguist Naomi Baron, in explaining university students’ preference for print, maintains that while digital is convenient and easy to read on-line, it comes with distractions, encourages multi-tasking, skim reading and poor comprehension.

As a result, print, while often pronounced dead, seems to be in a type of resurgence. I see a parallel with vinyl vs digital music among purists.

Yesterday I received a digital copy of a new print magazine launched by the Quebec City Convention Centre. I was staggered by the professionalism of this title.

http://www.myvirtualpaper.com/doc/centre-des-congres-quebec/ccq_revue2016_flippage_ang/2016053001/#0

Earlier in the month I read of the launch of a new print magazine for Silicon Valley! A print magazine – dead tree technology – is seen as the way to stand out in Ground Zero of the digital world. Print, for Silicon Valley residents, stands out and carries a greater weight. Perhaps they find attraction in the retro chic of print.

VisitBritain, which last year announced a new social media focus, refocused in March to produce their own print magazine as part of their marketing thrust. Expedia – the on-line booking agency – also produces a print magazine. As does AirBnB.

A conversation with a Vancouver meeting executive amplified the challenge of a purely social media presence. She tried to call up her company’s blog while we spoke. She couldn’t access it. Her company’s software blocked her from opening another link. This executive says she receives over 100 emails a day. The bulk of them are sales pitches, which she deletes without opening. However, when something comes via snail mail, she is more inclined to devote time to read it.

Three weeks ago in London I saw bookstores filled with readers. On the Tubes, out of every four people reading, three were reading print – either a book or newspaper. Those holding print products were younger. It was Baby Boomers who had the electronic readers (maybe drawn by the large print function…). The Saturday I flew back to Canada, The Guardian produced a 20-page book review section! Even in Canada, book sales are up 5%.

Maybe those titles which struggle, struggle because they don’t offer their readers much in the way of information, ideas and entertainment. With so much cannibalization of content there is a lack of originality.

That struggle to provide engaging, useful and the right information and story translates to social media. It’s pointless to be on all social media platforms if your message isn’t the right message for the audience you hope to attract. The competition for attention exists. It’s the destination’s and property’s duty to be pertinent. And if print isn’t part of your marketing mix, the disciplines of print newsgathering and story-telling still stand up.

As one former publisher wrote, “I don’t know where media is going but I think being interesting, credible and seductive will remain important.”

Destination Doctor can help with your story telling and curating the right facts for your audience. Whatever media you employ.